Faster Patent Processing Still Won't Be Fast Enough

Interesting article by Jennifer Martinez on Politico last week: Tech investors call for patent reform, followed by an even more interesting response from a tech VC, Gary Lauder of Lauder Partners, the day after. The essence of the Martinez article is that certain VCs suggest that we need a separate patent regime for software because our existing system is unable to keep up with the rapid pace of software development. Mr. Lauder's response recalls my post from last month in which I questioned whether even 20 months would be fast enough.  Politico quotes him as saying: "The patent backlog is the primary problem, not laws providing fair protections to inventors. The patent backlog for software and Internet patents is now at least 40 months in an industry that re-invents itself several times a year. This is caused by the patent office's revenue being diverted away by Congress, so it can't hire sufficient examiners."

Mr. Lauder went on to highlight one obstacle to patent reform.  Politico quotes him as suggesting: "it may make sense to adopt different rules for software patents (e.g. forced Peer-to-Patent), but I would be concerned that the body that comes up with such rules would not adequately represent the ones who need patents most: start-ups."