IP Counsel Must Communicate With Marketing and Manufacturing Personnel - Redux

Following up on my April 4, 2010 post concerning false patent marking, the Federal Circuit ruled last week in the Pequignot v. Solo Cup case.  Here is my take away.

1. Marking a product with an expired patent number is false marking.  Solo Cup argued that because the public could look up the patent, marking with an expired number was not misleading.  The Court explained that it is not so simple to determine when a patent expires and so it could be misleading.

2. Marking a product with a legend that says something like "this product may be protected by one or more patents" is not false marking, but neither is it adequate marking under 35 U.S.C. 287, so that does not seem like a very effective strategy.

3. To be actionable, false marking must be intentional. The marking must be for the purpose of deceiving the public.

4. Proof that a marking is false and that the marker knew of its falsity, creates a rebuttable presumption of intent to deceive.

5. The accused can rebut the presumption by proving, by a preponderance of the evidence, that he did not consciously desire that the public be deceived.  One way to do that would be to prove that the accused relied on reasonable advice of counsel. Merely asserting that one had no such intent will not be sufficient. 

On a related note, on remand the district court in the Forest Group case awarded damages in the amount of the highest price for which the 38 falsely marked stilts at issue in that case sold ($180, prices ranged from $103-$180).  The total award was only $6,840, but if courts are going to award what amounts to gross revenues on products sold for $500 or less, penalties for false marking could be severe.

Trackbacks (0) Links to blogs that reference this article Trackback URL
http://iplawwatch.foxrothschild.com/admin/trackback/207029
Comments (0) Read through and enter the discussion with the form at the end
Post A Comment / Question Use this form to add a comment to this entry.







Remember personal info?
Send To A Friend Use this form to send this entry to a friend via email.